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Palatinehill1

Model by André Caron, Maquettes Historiques


COMMUNITY PAGES PORTAL
Aventine | Caelian | Campus Martius | Capitoline | Esquiline
Forum | Palatine | Quirinal | Trans Tiberim | Viminal



Welcome to the Palatine HillEdit

The Palatine Hill (Latin: Collis Palatium) is the centermost of the Seven Hills of Rome and is one of the most ancient parts of the city. It stands 40 metres above the Forum Romanum, looking down upon it on one side, and upon the Circus Maximus on the other. It is the etymological origin of the word "palace."

According to Roman mythology, the Palatine hill was where Romulus and Remus were found by the she-wolf that kept them alive. According to this legend, the shepherd Faustulus found the infants, and with his wife Acca Larentia raised the children. When they were older this is where Romulus decided to build Rome. Rome has its origins on the Palatine. Indeed, recent excavations show that people have lived there since approximately 1000 BC. Many affluent Romans of the Republican period (510 BC – c. 44 BC) had their residences there. The ruins of the palaces of Augustus (63 BC – 14), Tiberius (42 BC – 37) and Domitian (51 – 96) can still be seen. Augustus also built a temple to Apollo here, beside his house. The Palatine Hill was also the site of the festival of the Lupercalia.

One building, believed to be the residence of Livia (58 BC – 29), the wife of Augustus, is currently undergoing renovation. Situated near to the house of Livia is the temple of Cybele, currently not fully excavated and not open to the public. Behind this structure, cut into the side of the hill, is the so-called House of Tiberius.

Overlooking the Forum Romanum is the Flavian Palace which was built largely during the reign of the Flavian dynasty (69 – 96) – Vespasian, Titus and Domitian. This palace, which was extended and modified by several emperors, extends across the Palatine Hill and looks out over the Circus Maximus. The building of the greater part the palace visible from the Circus was undertaken in the reign of the emperor Septimius Severus (146 – 211).

Immediately adjacent to the palace of Severus is the Hippodrome of Domitian. This is a structure which has the appearance of a Roman Circus and whose name means Cirgus in Greek, but is of insufficient size to accommodate chariots. It can be better described as a Greek Stadium, that is, a venue for foot races. However, the exact purpose of this one is disputed. While it is certain that during the Severan period it was used for sporting events, it was most likely originally built as a garden shaped like a stadium. According to guide from the Sopraintendenza Archeologica di Roma, most of the statuary in the nearby Palatine museum comes from the Hippodrome. (Domitian also built a larger stadium that was actually used for foot-racing competitions; it exists today as Piazza Navona, lo stadio di Domiziano.)

The Palatine Hill is now a large open-air museum and can be visited during the daytime for a small charge on the same ticket as Colosseum. There are two entrances, one near the Arch of Titus on the Forum Romanum and the other on Via di San Gregorio, the street just beyond the Arch of Constantine, going away from the Colosseum.

During Augustus' reign, an area of the Palatine Hill was roped off for a sort of archaeological expedition, which found fragments of Bronze Age pots and tools. He declared this site the "original town of Rome". Modern archaeology has identified evidence of Bronze Age settlement in the area which predates Rome's founding. There is a museum on the Palatine in which artifacts dating from before the official foundation of the City are displayed. The museum also contains Roman statuary.

An altar to an unknown deity, once thought to be Aius Locutius, was discovered here in 1820.

In July 2006, archaeologists announced the discovery of the Palatine House, which they believe to be the birthplace of Rome's first Emperor, Augustus. Head archaeologist Clementina Panella uncovered a section of corridor and other fragments under Rome's Palatine Hill, which she described on July 20 as "a very ancient aristocratic house." The two story house appears to have been built around an atrium, with frescoed walls and mosaic flooring, and is situated on the slope of the Palatine that overlooks the Colosseum and the Arch of Constantine. The Republican-era houses on the Palatine were overbuilt by later palaces after the Great Fire of Rome (64), but apparently this one was not; the tempting early inference is that it was preserved for a specific and important reason. On the ground floor, three shops opened onto the Via Sacra.

The location of the domus is important because of its potential proximity to the Curiae Veteres, the earliest shrine of the curies of Rome.

In January 2007 Italian archeologist Irene Iacopi announced that she probably found the legendary Lupercal cave beneath the remains of Emperor Augustus' palace on the Palatine. Archaeologists came across the 15-meter-deep cavity while working to restore the decaying palace. The first photos of the cave show a richly decorated vault encrusted with mosaics and seashells. The Lupercal was probably converted to a sanctuary by Romans in later centuries.


Community Streets for ResidentsEdit

01 - Clivus Palatinus
02 - Clivus Sacer
03 - Clivus Victoriae
04 - Nova Via
05 - Via Sacra
06 - Vicus Apollinis
07 - Vicus Bublarius
08 - Vicus Curiarium
09 - Vicus Huiusce Diei
10 - Vicus Fortunae Respicientis
11 - Vicus Padi
12 - Vicus Salutaris
13 - Vicus Tuscus


Sites of InterestEdit

  • Aedes Minerva ~ Welcome to Aedes Parva Minervae, the Little Temple of Minerva, an unofficial sodality of Nova Roma. All are welcome here who love Our Most Wise Lady and come in a spirit of honest friendship and peaceful reverence for all Wisdom. The Little Temple seeks to bring the Goddess of Wisdom into all aspects of our lives and the lives of all. We honor Her by our prayers, rituals, research, and creativity. Guided by Her, we come here to explore Her every facet that can be elucidated by human mind and skill.
  • Aedes Magna Mater ~ The main sanctuary of Rome dedicated to this goddess of the Patricians. It was inaugurated in 191 and stood originally on the west corner of the hill.
  • Circus Maximus ~ Here you can get information on the racing factiones, past and future Ludi Circenses, etc. More information on the Ludi Circenses can be found in the Campus Martius community.
  • Hippodrome of Domitian ~ Immediately adjacent to the palace of Severus is the Hippodrome of Domitian. This is a structure which has the appearance of a Roman Circus and whose name means Circus in Greek, but is too small to accommodate chariots. It can be better described as a Greek Stadium, that is, a venue for foot races. However, its exact purpose is disputed. While it is certain that during the Severan period it was used for sporting events, it was most likely originally built as a garden shaped like a stadium. Here it is the UK Channel 4's Chariot Race Game for Kids (from the AD1 Programme Page).
  • Palace of Severus ~ Here, it is the home of the Societas Iuventutis Romanae and site for Nova Roman and other Roman-inspired kids.
  • Add an historic Roma site in this community or update an unfinished link above


Community AdministrationEdit

Praefectus: vacant

The position of Praefectus (Prefect) of this community is currently vacant. The Praefectus position is a community administrator, responsible for updating, maintaining and overseeing of this community. Interested in becoming the Prefect of this community?

Contact: lucius_vitellius_triarius@yahoo. com


www.novaroma.org


COMMUNITY PAGES PORTAL
Aventine | Caelian | Campus Martius | Capitoline | Esquiline
Forum | Palatine | Quirinal | Trans Tiberim | Viminal


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